The PPR welcomes newly appointed Director Ian Grant

The PPR sadly says goodbye to Amanda Hamilton as a founding Director of the PPR, who has resigned for personal reasons. We can however say hello to our newly appointed Director, Ian Grant who is a lawyer of many years standing and has been involved in the Paralegal sector for many years. Ian will bring with him a wealth of legal and sector knowledge. Ian commented,

‘I am delighted to be appointed as a Director of the PPR as it is an organisation that promotes a voluntary regulatory scheme for Paralegals and protects consumers, both of which I firmly believe are required to encourage a diverse legal services industry’

PPR Conference 2017- Tickets are now on sale

The PPR are delighted to bring you its second conference for Paralegals on 22nd June at Wyboston Lakes, Bedford. Managing Director Rita Leat commented,

“ Last year’s conference was a sell-out and a huge success due to the delegates’ enthusiastic engagement throughout the whole day. We have an even better line-up of workshops this year along with high profile speakers from the profession. It will provide a fantastic opportunity for networking and for keeping up to date with sector developments”.

Click here for more information and to book tickets

The PPR welcomes the incoming Chair, Sarah Docx

The PPR has bid a fond farewell to Chris White who was the inaugural Chair of the PPR Advisory Board as he takes up new challenges in his career.  The PPR would like to thank Chris for all his work and support and wish him well in the future.

The PPR welcomes the incoming Chair, Sarah Docx, who has many years experience working within Financial Regulation as a Financial Services Compliance Officer.  You can see Sarah’s full bio under the Home Tab:  The Boards – The Advisory Board.

Offering Legal Services - Are we clear now?

Having attended the Westminster Policy Forum Keynote Seminar on The Legal Services Market- Regulation, Innovation and the Future of the Legal Services Act, I think I can honestly say that at last some progress on debates that have rumbled on for years, has been made.

Regulation and the Legal Services Act

We have the Competition and Markets Authority to thank back in 2001, from their former remit under The Office of Fair Trading, for producing a report which led to the Clementi Review and finally The Legal Services Act 2007.

Why do we thank them? Well, in the main there have been many positives that have come out of the LSA 2007, not least the discussions and reports over the last nine years that have led us to a more diverse legal profession with more focus on the consumer both in terms of choice and protection.

The Legal Services Act was fit for purpose in 2007, but the provision of legal services has moved on to become ever more consumer driven, that requires innovation at the heart of its thinking. A new Act of Parliament is therefore needed to cope with the latest trends in legal service provision.

The illogical reserved activities under the LSA 2007 have been a barrier to a progressive legal services market, preventing professional, competent and often more cost effective unregulated providers to compete in the market place. Of course I am talking about PPR Paralegals who now have the ability to be subject to voluntary regulation under the PPR and have Paralegal Practising Certificates. Why should our professionals be prevented from conducting litigation when they are competent to do so? Does this help to combat the crisis that we have in the civil courts where litigants in person are an ever increasing occurrence with no legal representation in sight?

The Legal Services Board has published its ‘Vision on Reform’ and a key component of that is to replace the current eight regulatory objectives with just one:

‘Safeguard the public interest by protecting consumers and ensuring the delivery of outcomes in the interests of society as a whole.’

At a first glance it is difficult to argue against its sentiment but a closer look raises the question as to who decides what is in the public’s interest? Isn’t cost effective legal services paramount to addressing the unmet legal need, even if it is unregulated?

The regulatory landscape is cumbersome, the LSA 2007 itself is 400 pages long. Regulation is now being championed by the SRA on a risk-based approach and recent indications suggest that in order to cut the cost of regulation, the corporate sector may well be left to a certain degree, to regulate itself.

The LSB appears to be seeking complete regulatory independence of regulators from any representative or commercial interests. This is to be applauded and if it is ever achieved then it is quite possible that the role of the LSB will no longer be required.

The SRA has circa 1,000 new ABS’s likely to be licensed this year. This is good news to help open up the market and to welcome innovation into the sector.

So what can the LSB and its regulators do to ensure that the legal services market truly offers the consumer what it needs?

Firstly, it needs to embrace the opening up of the market to include ‘unregulated’ providers such as Professional Paralegals. Secondly, in order to enable growth in the sector, the burden of regulation needs to be lifted where it is not needed, and finally they should address the need for education of consumers, to enable them to make informed choices.

Kathryn Stone, Chief Legal Ombudsman recently made an extremely valid point that redress for consumers needs to develop alongside the regulatory framework.

Consumers need to know prior to engaging a provider of legal services, what right for redress they have and to whom, should things go wrong.

This is where the PPR has bridged the gap- consumer clients of our members have redress through the PPR where otherwise they have no redress not even from the Legal Ombudsman.

Legal Services

More recently, the CMA published its interim findings on the supply of legal services and I agree with their conclusion that the lack of transparency on price and service is undermining competition, reducing the incentives for providers to compete on price, quality and innovation.

So, what are we getting wrong?

The rise of comparison websites has made it easier for consumers to compare legal service providers in terms of recommendation, but it would appear that legal service providers are still not being clear and transparent with consumers in terms of costs and the services that they will receive.

Latest findings show that 46% of legal services to the consumer are concluded on a fixed fee basis. This clearly indicates a preference by consumers to know how much the service will cost them up front. Of course not all services are easy to bundle or unbundle to provide a fixed fee cost but areas that are procedure driven such as conveyancing are finding fixed fees a popular choice by their clients.

Two thirds of consumers recently surveyed think that legal services are too expensive. Small businesses, that make up 99% of British businesses think that legal services are unaffordable and turn to their accountants, HR departments or google for advice, even though 86% of them agree that legal services are essential to their business.

Of course there is the school of thought that suggests that stimulating competition by price alone effects professional standards. But why should that be?

The costs for legal services is not and never has been an indication of professionalism.

Solicitors cannot offer unregulated legal services outside of a regulated entity, but if they could, does that mean it would affect their professional standards?

It would appear that legal service providers need to provide clearer signals in terms of services offered, the quality of those services, and the costs that they charge at the point of need.

With 1:4 consumers now actively shopping around for legal services, 1:4 using on-line services and 1:5 using unbundled services, legal service providers need to address the needs of individual consumers, corporate consumers and SME consumers and not offer a one-size fits all package.

PPR Voluntary Regulation

We already put the consumer at the heart of our regulatory scheme. We have a complaints procedure and a compensation fund available for clients of PPR Professional Paralegals who have a Paralegal Practising Certificate.

We will over the coming year be looking at transparency in terms of services offered and costs. It is not for us to tell you the type of business model you should have or the type of fee structure, but it is our role to inform you of current trends in the way that consumers want to access and pay for their legal services.

Fixed fees appear to be the preferred option for consumers however where this is not possible, then it is clear that consumers need to know the full extent of the actual and likely costs at the point of need.

The future for PPR Paralegals is bright, the opportunities for you to grow your businesses have never been so good. If you are not a member of the PPR and do not have a Paralegal Practising Certificate then in terms of redress for consumers, you will quite simply be unable to compete.

Rita Leat, Managing Director, PPR

 

The Association of Probate Researchers has achieved Recognised Body status of the PPR

The PPR is proud to announce that the Association of Probate Researchers (APR) has achieved Recognised Body status of the PPR. The new professional body that has been set up by Fraser and Fraser will welcome into its fold Probate Research companies and individuals who would like to offer their clients the greatest protection by being regulated under this voluntary scheme.

Rita Leat MD PPR commented:

“Professional Probate Researchers provide an invaluable service for beneficiaries who may not otherwise inherit from their deceased’s families’ estates. We are delighted that these professionals can now receive the recognition they deserve along with suitable regulation provided by the PPR”.

If you would like to join the APR then contact Martin Quinn membership@a-p-r.org
www.a-p-r.org

New CEO for the Instructus Group

The Trustees wish to make the following announcements concerning the CEO of the Instructus Group:

David Holland, as CEO of the Instructus Group, is leaving the group on July 6th 2016 having been associated with the organisation in a variety of senior roles for 12 years.

We are delighted to announce the appointment of Andrew Hammond as the new CEO for the Instructus Group. He will start the new role on Monday July 25, 2016.

Read more

Conference Review

Thank you to everyone for their participation in the PPR Conference on 21st April.

The analysis of the conference feedback forms (75 returned from 150 participants) shows that the event was very well received as a valuable, stimulating and enjoyable day, particularly for making contact with other Paralegals, learning about the PPR position in the sector, and inspiring individuals’ commitment to joining the PPR.

From the PPR perspective, the event provided a great opportunity to further its aims of establishing itself as the voluntary regulator for Paralegals. Added to this, discussions during the day – particularly in the workshop sessions – have helped identify priority areas for focus such as providing clearer information on the Tiers and the advantages of applying for a PPC .

The majority of delegates who completed the conference feedback forms rated the conference as a whole as “exceeded expectation” or “exceptional”. The keynote speech from Steve Green and the opening address by Rita Leat  attracted comments such as “great keynote” and “excellent – really interesting and fascinating speaker”. There was much enthusiasm in the panel discussion which, in a way, reflected the enthusiastic way in which the delegates participated in this activity: ” The panel session was very good but too short!” The closing remarks were also well received “I feel that you are pioneers for the sector!”

The most common rating for the usefulness of the workshops was “exceeded expectation”. The presenters of the workshops were rated by the majority as “exceeded expectation” or “exceptional”. Ian Grant from Heselwood & Grant attracted comments such as “witty, informative and engaging presenter”, “a really great presenter”. Some delegates commented “that the Business workshop was a bit too generic but that the presenter was very good”. One delegate commented “I wanted to attend all of the workshops!”.

The choice of venue was also very popular with the delegates: the majority rated the convenience of the location, its comfort and facilities and the catering as “exceeded expectation or “exceptional”. One delegate tweeted “enjoying a great lunch at the PPR conference”.

Those who were involved in the conference organisation and administration were pleased that most delegates rated the arrangements as “exceeded expectation”, both prior to the conference and on the day itself. Particularly appreciated was the additional “social” information provided in advance of the conference which, it is believed, contributed to the friendly atmosphere of the event. Delegate’s comments included “A very well organised conference with a positive atmosphere. Thanks to all those who put effort into making this happen”.

Feedback from our virtual participants, of which there were at least 29 actively following the conference via #pprConf on Twitter  also showed enthusiasm for the proceedings of the day.

58 of the 75 delegates said that they would ‘absolutely’ or ‘very likely’ attend the next conference.

Conference thanks

Of course, an enormous amount of effort goes into planning a conference such as this, and we owe thanks to all involved. First we are very grateful to the conference sponsors.

A special vote thanks is also due to the speakers, chairs and the brave panel speakers for their contributions on the day, as well as the hard work devoted to preparing for their roles. We should also recognise that without the commitment of the PPR conference team we would not have enjoyed such a well organised day – as one delegate remarked –  “I have attended many conferences but I have never experienced such enthusiasm and engagement by the delegates”.

There are many individuals whose work behind the scenes deserves special recognition and are too many to name but two should be recognised. Our conference co-ordinator on the day Dorothy Campbell did a sterling job keeping everyone on track. Raffaele Corriero our digital expert managed all of the media screens, the presentations both in the plenary session and also assisted all of the workshop presenters.

Conference resources

Presentations

Video

Photos

The PPR have published their Business Plan for 2016/17

The Business Plan has been developed collaboratively by the efforts of the Board of Directors, the Register Regulatory Committee and the Independent Advisory Board.
It highlights the strategy of the PPR and its wider business and regulatory objectives.

The PPR has highlighted that it will focus on delivering a transparent and proportionate voluntary regulatory scheme for its members; promoting the Paralegal Profession as the Fourth Arm of the Legal Profession; increasing consumer protection in the unregulated market and increasing membership of the PPR.

Managing Director, Rita Leat said

“The Business Plan represents our vision for the future of Paralegal Practitioners within the legal framework and clearly outlines our aims and objectives for improving diversity within the sector. Consumer protection is of paramount importance in the delivery of legal services”.

Please download the PPR Business plan

Professional Paralegal Practising Certificates

The PPR Managing Director announced today that the first batch of Paralegal Practising Certificates will be sent out to successful applicants this week.

‘This is a proud day for all Paralegals who finally have the professional status that they deserve. Professionalism is gained through the acquisition of knowledge and skills via qualifications, training and experience, with adequate regulation to ensure professional and ethical standards are maintained.

Paralegal Practising Certificates enable suitably qualified and experienced Paralegals to offer legal services to the public whilst the PPR’s voluntary regulatory scheme provides protection to the consumer should things go wrong.’

If you are a Tier 2 or above registered Paralegal under the PPR then you can apply for a PPC and benefit from having the ability to practice direct to consumers.

If you would like to apply for a PPC, please visit the PPR website www.ppr.org.uk/paralegals/practising-certificates/ or telephone 0845 862 7000 for more details.