A Day in the life of a PI

During her travels around the country our MD, Rita Leat meets some very interesting people and this ‘Life in the day of’ blog is our way of sharing our networking with our members.  First in this series is an article from Dave Clark, who shares with us his day as a PI.

A Day in the life of a PI

Up and about early today, need to be in the office by 6am, we have a busy day ahead.

First order of business is to get the staff organised and on the road. John will be in at 8am, he has several Winding up Petitions, and Statutory Demands, all Limited Companies, to be served. These almost invariably are served in office hours and within forty eight hours of receipt by us.

Terry is working later, he has various Process serves as well, but these are individuals, usually easier to find in the early evenings and weekends.

Once their papers and routes are ready, I can turn to the e-mails, hard to believe this many arrived whilst I slept! Some are update requests on work in hand, quotes for new work, tracing instructions, and general enquiries from the mundane to the bizarre.

The overnight ones tend to be private clients and overseas. During the day I will get the professional clients, other Agents, Solicitors and Paralegals, all of whom understand the demands on us and are usually better organised and don’t suffer from over expectation!

Now I can organise my day, although organise is a fluid term.

I check the electronic trackers on the web platform, see if our targets have been busy, and how much battery life we have left. One is quite low, (note to self ), out at 3am to change the battery pack. I collect the process serves I have to fit in en route today, and head out to my morning networking meeting, praying for a decent breakfast. I know the phone will start around 8am must remember to put it on silent.

Networking over, couple of interesting contacts, now to the day proper.

We have a request for a surveillance this evening, cheating husband apparently, where does he get the time? Bearing in mind I am now out very early to change the tracker batteries, I ring round to find who wants the job, as always John is keen, and my preferred option as we were both Special Branch trained.

Always a minefield these jobs. Private clients want you to peer through windows and get “in flagrante” photos, completely outside of RIPA. At least our professional contacts, especially our PPR Paralegals talk the matter through and understand the legislative constraints.

Try explaining RIPA, HRA or even PACE to an outraged partner, never goes well.

I also have two repossessions to collect today, both cars, so off goes Chris my towing expert, armed with his paperwork and usual grumpy attitude, hey ho.

My favourite local Solicitor (because he hates going out and gets us to do most things!) has asked for a quote for attending a commercial property, changing the locks and completing an inventory, need to get that out today.

I also need to arrange a couple of test purchases this week in a bar selling unbranded booze as the real thing, list of volunteers for that is growing daily.

As always some new stuff will arrive, invariably urgent, just to ruin the day, some will be cancelled and some will go so horribly wrong you just wonder what you did to upset the big guy!

But on the upside the range of work means I am never bored, and also the range of people I meet is always interesting. If I had more space the stories I could tell!

So if you need a PI or Process Server give us a call at Adams for help anywhere in the country on 020 3745 5711, or speak to Dave direct on 07787 555 932.

Enter the British Wills & Probate Awards

Would you like to win an industry accolade for high achievement in the sector?British Wills and Probate Awards

Following the overwhelming success of last year’s event, The British Wills & Probate Awards are back – bigger and better.

Taking place on the 17th October 2019, the prestigious awards are being held at the Belfry Hotel and Resort in Birmingham. The 2019 attendee list is double the size of last year, reaching just shy of 300.

The awards will again be hosted by broadcaster and journalist Jennie Bond, who appears regularly on a wide range of television and radio programmes – from light entertainment to documentaries.

Why not highlight your achievement and successes in the Wills and Probate sector by entering the awards?

Not only will you have the chance of winning an award, you will also receive the following benefits:

  • Full coverage on leading news publication Today’s Wills & Probate
  • Content to use for your marketing purposes
  • Use of the British Wills & Probate Awards logo
  • Enhanced brand profile and recognition
  • Networking opportunities

With more choice of categories to choose from than ever before, you and your firm will be sure to find plenty to apply for, especially as you can enter up to three categories for the cost of £145 plus VAT – which is less than the cost of writing a Will for most of us, and of course, the more categories you enter, the more chance you have of being shortlisted and maybe even winning.

To find out more about this year’s new categories and which ones best represent your business please click here. The closing date for submissions is 14th June, so don’t wait, get your nominations in now!

Furthermore, bookings for this key event are now open here where you will find information and pricing for individual tickets and whole tables of twelve.

If you would like more information about how the awards work and how to go about entering please call Josh Hall on 01829 307 505 or email [email protected]bate.co.uk

British Wills & Probate Awards with Jennie Bond

British Wills & Probate Awards 2019

Spotlight on the PPR Register Regulatory Committee

In this article Amanda Lee, Chair of the RRC explains what is the purpose of the committee, how it handles complaints and how you can get involved.

What is the Register Regulatory Committee? 

The Register Regulatory Committee (RRC) is responsible for managing the Professional Paralegal Register (PPR) and providing strategic and operational advice on issues that affect the PPR. To fulfil this role it considers advice received from the PPR’s independent Advisory Board.

Led by Chair Amanda Lee, the RRC is composed of six members with professional experience in a broad range of different disciplines. Members of the RRC are committed to ensuring that members of the PPR uphold the highest standards of professional service and support the PPR’s goals of raising the profile of professional paralegals and protecting consumers.

What does it do?

The RRC plays a vital role in supporting the PPR’s mission of providing its members and the public with the ability to make informed choices when choosing a legal representative. If a complaint is made about a registered or regulated paralegal then the RRC is responsible for considering that complaint and taking whatever action is necessary.

The RRC acts in accordance with clear rules and procedures in order to ensure that complaints are considered fairly and in a timely fashion. It therefore helps the PPR to ensure that paralegal work is of the highest standard by providing consumers with a remedy if they have any complaints about the work undertaken by a PPR member.

How does the RRC handle complaints?

The RRC’s powers differ depending on whether the complaint made relates to a regulated or registered paralegal. It may dismiss complaints or impose some sort of sanction if it is determined that a complaint should be upheld, such as requiring a paralegal to pay compensation or suspending their PPR membership. These broad powers help it to protect the public and to ensure that the standard of service provided by paralegals that are voluntarily regulated by the PPR is reflective of the high standards of service that PPR members strive to provide to their clients. 

The RRC has the power to appoint independent bodies to investigate complaints. If the value of the compensation sought by the complaining party is £500 or less then the RRC will appoint a Complaints Committee to consider the allegations made and determine whether any sanctions should be applied to the paralegal involved. If the value of the compensation sought exceeds £500 then the RRC will appoint an independent Adjudication and Appeals Panel. This panel has broader powers and the ability to impose a penalty of up to £5,000.

How can I get involved?

If you are interested in supporting the important work of the RRC then please consider applying to join the committee. The RRC meets a minimum of twice per year. The deadline to apply is 20 December 2019. For further information see the advertisement here.